Friday, December 9, 2011

This is a test of using MathJax in Blogger   Note that enclosing math in single $'s does not work in the default setting for MathJax.  However, you may use "\(\backslash(\)" and "\(\backslash)\)" for inline math and double dollar signs or "\(\backslash[\)" and "\(\backslash]\)" for displayed math.  Examples:  $(y+\sqrt z)^{-1}$ and  \( \sin^2 x^2 \).  And, a displayed equation is: $$\frac 2 3$$
Another displayed equation is here:
\[
\forall x \exists y (x\le y \land y\le x \leftrightarrow x=y) .
\]

To setup the MathJax capability, I added the following line to the HTML code, after the <head> command (as a single line, no line break):

<script src='http://cdn.mathjax.org/mathjax/latest/MathJax.js?config=TeX-AMS-MML_HTMLorMML' type='text/javascript'/>

You can find more information from the MathJax website about this at http://www.mathjax.org/docs/1.1/start.html.

For slightly different ways to set up MathJax with Blogger, see http://holdenweb.blogspot.com/2011/11/blogging-mathematics.html, or
http://irrep.blogspot.com/2011/07/mathjax-in-blogger-ii.html.



45 comments:

  1. However, so far, I do not have MathJax working in the comments. For example: \( e^{i\pi} = -1 \).

    Suggestions on how to fix this are welcome.

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  2. Correction: The mathematics will appear correctly once the comment is posted, but it does not appear correctly in the preview window when you are preparing your comment.

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  3. \begin{matrix}
    a & b\cr
    c & d
    \end{matrix}

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  4. \begin{matrix} a & b\cr c & d \end{matrix}

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  5. \[P(E) = {n \choose k} p^k (1-p)^{n-k}\]

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  6. \def\arccosAlt{\cos^{-1}} so that $\arccosAlt(x)$

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  7. $$\cosh^2 x - \sinh^2 x = 1$$

    Testing only

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  8. \( \sin^2 x + \cos^2 x = 1 \)

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  9. \sin^2 x + \cos^2 x = 1

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  10. \cosh^2 x - \sinh^2 x = 1

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  11. \( \cosh^2 x - \sinh^2 x = 1 \)

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  12. \(\sin x\)
    \(\sin x)

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  13. \(\dim T^2V^*=n^2\)

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  22. 1.why \(\tilde f (z)={\bar \psi}^{-1}(f(\phi(z)))\) but not \(\tilde f (z)={\psi}^{-1}(f(\phi(z)))\)?
    2.do we have \(d\tilde \phi_x\)? if yes, what does it mean?
    3.can u show us how \(Tf_p\) is independent of the choice of \(\phi\) and \(\psi\)

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  24. Testing..
    \[\LaTeX\]

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  26. I'd like to have a \( 1/2 \) glass of common sense please.

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  27. I'd like to have a \[ 1/2 \] glass of common sense please.

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  28. \[\left ( \alpha +\beta \right )^2 = \alpha ^2+\beta ^2+2\alpha \beta \]

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  29. \( \sum_{i=0}^{n} 2^i = 2^{n+1}\)

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    Replies
    1. \( \sum_{i=0}^n 2^i = 2^{n+1}-1\)

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  31. \[
    \begin{aligned}
    \nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{B}} -\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{E}}}{\partial t} & = \frac{4\pi}{c}\vec{\mathbf{j}} \\ \nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{E}} & = 4 \pi \rho \\
    \nabla \times \vec{\mathbf{E}}\, +\, \frac1c\, \frac{\partial\vec{\mathbf{B}}}{\partial t} & = \vec{\mathbf{0}} \\
    \nabla \cdot \vec{\mathbf{B}} & = 0 \end{aligned}
    \]

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  33. test
    $\displaystyle \int_0^{\infty} \sqrt{4x} \, e^{-x} \, dx$ = $2\displaystyle \int_0^{\infty} \sqrt{x} \, e^{-x} \, dx = 2 \Gamma\left(\frac{3}{2}\right) = 2 \frac{1}{2} \, \Gamma\left(\frac{1}{2}\right) = \sqrt{\pi}$

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    Replies
    1. $$2\displaystyle \int_0^{\infty} \sqrt{x} \, e^{-x} \, dx = 2 \Gamma\left(\frac{3}{2}\right) = 2 \frac{1}{2} \, \Gamma\left(\frac{1}{2}\right) = \sqrt{\pi}$$

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  34. \[\bar{x}=\frac{1}{n}\sum\limits_{i=1}^{n}{x_i}\]

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